Summer Experiences for Undergraduates with William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute

Equine Management

William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute is located in Chazy, New York, about 40 miles south of Montreal in the Champlain Valley. For more than a quarter of a century, the Institute has conducted programs in education and research, foremost of which are in-residence undergraduate programs in agriculture and environmental science. The Summer Experience programs in Equine Management, Farm Management, and Agricultural Research offer credits through a combination of workshops, field trips, and independent study. The William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute consists of 8,600 acres of land, including miles of hiking and biking trails available to students. Our dairy facility houses approximately 300 registered Holstein cows in an automated free stall barn and 16-stall tie stall barn used for conducting research trials. The dairy and crop operation serve as a learning environment for students enrolled in the Summer Experience in Farm Management program. The most prominent original farm building is currently home to Miner Institute’s herd of approximately 25 Morgan horses. In addition, there are horses boarded for various purposes including stallion or mare reproductive services and training. A phantom breeding mount and fully-equipped laboratory at the barns allow for on-site collection and processing of fresh-cooled and frozen semen.

 

ABOUT THE PROGRAM Weekly meetings update the students about farm activities; equine, dairy, crops and research. Extended sessions on relevant topics such as nutrition, reproduction, training, health and field crops will be held throughout the summer. Instructors include Miner Institute faculty members Katie Ballard, Kurt Cotanch, Heather Dann, Wanda Emerich, Rick Grant, Karen Lassell. The small class size makes it possible to tailor the program to better meet the needs of each student. Students interested in careers in stable or breeding management, agricultural extension, and veterinary medicine have found this program to be particularly useful. Each student will choose a project horse to evaluate, train, and market for sale. Responsibilities for this project will include preparing a video of the horse as well as oral and written final presentations on the horse and the process. An active research program at Miner includes aspects in the equine area such as stallion semen preservation and horse behavior. The students are crucial to making these studies happen and are invited to become more involved if interest takes them in that direction.

 

Students will learn ground training techniques including halter breaking, lungeing, longlining, and ground driving. The versatility of the Morgan and varied ages and abilities of horses at Miner Institute allow for students to experience many different disciplines to varying degrees: saddleseat, huntseat, dressage, western pleasure and driving. Students become proficient at stallion handling, semen collection, and processing as well as broodmare management. Students will have an opportunity to participate in other Miner farm operations including milking, pasture management, and a variety of fi eld work activities.

 

This program is available to agriculture and life science students in their junior or senior years of study. The number of students for the Equine Management program is limited to ensure the intensity of this “handson” experience. Each student’s stipend for the 13-week semester is $3,000. The students live at Miner Institute, where dormitory housing and breakfast and lunch each weekday are provided for $300 for the summer.

Application

Karen Lassell Equine Manager
Miner Institute
P.O. Box 90 Chazy, NY 12921
518-846-7121, ext. 120
518-846-8445 (fax)

Agricultural Research

The William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute is located in Chazy, New York, about 40 miles south of Montreal in the Champlain Valley. For more than a quarter century, Miner Institute has conducted programs in education and research, foremost of which are in-residence undergraduate programs in agriculture and environmental science. The Summer Experience in Agricultural Research offers a unique combination of work experience and independent study. The William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute consists of 8,600 acres of land, including many miles of hiking and biking trails available to students. The dairy facility houses ~ 300 lactating Holstein cows in an automated free stall barn. A pen equipped with the Calan Broadbent Feeding System and a 16 cow tie stall facility are used for conducting research trials. The dairy and crop operations serve as a learning environment for students enrolled in the Summer Experience in Farm Management program. Miner Institute also breeds, trains and shows a herd of approximately 25 Morgan horses, utilized by students enrolled in the Summer Experience in Equine Management program. Students interested in careers in veterinary medicine and graduate school will fi nd the Summer Experience in Agricultural Research useful in preparing for academic and career opportunities in the agricultural research field.

 

ABOUT THE PROGRAM Weekly meetings update the students about research and farm activities including dairy, crops and equine. Extended sessions on relevant topics such as nutrition, reproduction, mastitis management, animal health and fi eld crops will be held throughout the summer. Students will also participate in a weekly seminar series. Instructors include Miner Institute faculty members Katie Ballard, Kurt Cotanch, Heather Dann, Wanda Emerich, Rick Grant, Steve Kramer, Karen Lassell, Eric Young and graduate students. The small class size makes it possible to at least partially tailor the program to meet the needs of each student. Each student will become involved in an independent study project in one of the areas which is the focus of Miner Institute’s research program: dairy nutrition, dairy behavior, equine behavior, dairy reproduction, equine reproduction, crops, nutrient management, and calf management. Each student will work with a faculty member to plan, conduct, and summarize the project. At the end of the summer, oral and written reports will be presented. All students will be asked to work long hours on occasion, but no more so than would normally be expected in an agricultural research facility as a graduate student or technician. Students work approximately every other weekend.

 

This program is available to agriculture and life science students in their junior or senior years of study. Students are encouraged to register for college credit at their home institution. Students are responsible for making arrangements for credits. This program is designed as a 4-credit course, although other arrangements may be made through the student’s home institution. Each student’s stipend for the 13-week semester is $3,000. The students live at Miner Institute, where dormitory housing and breakfast and lunch each weekday are provided for $300 for the summer.

Application

Katie Ballard
Director of Research
Miner Institute
P.O. Box 90
Chazy, New York 12921
518-846-7121, ext. 112
518-846-8445 (fax)

 

Farm Management

The William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute is located in Chazy, New York, about 40 miles south of Montreal in the Champlain Valley. For more than a quarter century, Miner Institute has conducted programs in education and research, foremost of which are in-residence undergraduate programs in agriculture and environmental science. The Summer Experience in Farm Management offers credits through a combination of workshops and independent study. Modern facilities enable students to combine the commercial farm experience with applied management training. The William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute consists of 8,600 acres of land, including many miles of hiking and biking trails available to students. A dairy facility, newly constructed in 2008, houses approximately 300 registered Holstein cows in an automated free stall barn and 16-stall tie-stall barn used for conducting research trials. Miner Institute also breeds, trains and shows a herd of approximately 25 Morgan horses.

 

ABOUT THE PROGRAM The Summer Experience in Farm Management introduces students to the modern farm as a business, which has as its objective the conversion of plants into milk and meat. All students will be asked to work long hours on occasion, but no more so than would normally be expected on a dairy farm. Students work approximately every other weekend. Weekly meetings update the students about farm activities; a combination of dairy, crops. Extended sessions on relevant topics such as nutrition, reproduction, mastitis management, animal health, and field crops will be held throughout the summer. Instructors include Miner Institute faculty members Katie Ballard, Kurt Cotanch, Heather Dann, Wanda Emerich, Rick Grant, Karen Lassell, and Eric Young. The small class size makes it possible to at least partially tailor the program to meet the needs of each student. Students interested in careers in veterinary medicine, farm management, vocational agriculture and agricultural extension have found this program to be particularly useful. Students will get experience in aspects of everyday farm management practices such as milking, herd health, calves, and a variety of field work activities such as tillage, planting, and harvest. Students will participate in weekly farm management discussions with Steve Couture, Anna Pape and other barn staff. The students will also fi t and show a string of dairy cattle at the local county fair. Students will have the opportunity to enroll in an Artificial Insemination certification course offered in cooperation with personnel

from a bull stud. This optional course will be offered to all interested students.

 

This program is available to agriculture and life science students in their junior or senior years of study. Students are encouraged to register for college credit at their home institution. Students are responsible for making arrangements for credits. This program is designed as a 4-credit course, although other arrangements may be made through the student’s home institution. Each student’s stipend for the 13-week semester is $3,000. The students live at Miner Institute, where housing and breakfast and lunch each weekday are provided for $300 for the summer.

 Application

For more information, contact:
Wanda Emerich
Dairy Outreach Coordinator
Miner Institute
P.O. Box 90
Chazy, NY 12921
518-846-7121, ext. 117
518-846-8445 (fax)
emerich@whminer.com