AnSci Connection - January 2017

Notes from the Department Head

Happy New Year! Students are back and classes are getting started, so campus is busy again.

We are accepting applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor with research and teaching responsibilities involving the microbiome of food animals http://z.umn.edu/microbiomepos . Review of applicants will begin in February. In addition, we have initiated a search for a tenure-track Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist with responsibilities involving beef production systems http://www.ansci.umn.edu/news-events/employment/umn-positions. This individual will provide strong leadership and effective Extension programming and conduct translational research on critical issues related to beef production. Some examples of research topics associated with this position  include the use of reproductive techniques to enhance productivity, the impact of genetic decisions on production efficiency, beef nutritional environment and its interaction with reproductive health or productive processes, and production systems investigating the interaction of beef cattle and forage and grain crops. We believe the individuals filling these positions will significantly increase the teaching, Extension, and research capabilities of our department.

Our alumni are an impressive group who bring honor to our department and the University of Minnesota! We are proud to recognize and celebrate their great accomplishments and contributions with our first annual Animal Science Golden Alumni Award. Nominations for this year’s award are being accepted until February 15, 2017. The award will be presented during the Department’s Annual Showcase (April 11, 2017) which highlights the work of our faculty, students, and alumni. For more information please check the following website (http://www.ansci.umn.edu/2017-alumni-award).

We look forward to the coming year and the opportunities it provides and we wish all of you a happy and successful New Year!

Wishing you all the best.

Dr. William R. Dayton

Department Head

Teaching, Research, and Extension Highlights

Please join us in welcoming Dr. Isabelle Paquet-Durand to the University of Minnesota on Tuesday, February 7th at 3 pm in 365 Haecker Hall. Dr. Isabelle is a wildlife veterinarian, and founder and director of the Belize Wildlife Referral Clinic and Belize Wildlife Conservation Network. She will be here to talk about the Scarlet Macaw Project, a conservation initiative between the Wildlife Institute (WI), the Belize Wildlife & Referral Clinic (BWRC) and Friends for Conservation & Development (FCD).  The purpose of the Scarlet Macaw Protection Program is to support a specific Scarlet Macaw population in the Chiquibul Forest, which is under heavy poaching threat. The conservation strategy is to remove chicks from nest sites that are under heaviest threat of poaching, and for which security provision is most prohibitive. Chicks are reared with the aim to be reintroduced into the wild.

 

Animal Science students taking CFAN 3510: Wildlife Medicine and Conservation in Belize are able to participate in this project while in Belize. The Animal Biotechnology course (ANSC 3509) has also added a laboratory component that will participate in this project by genotyping these magnificent birds using DNA isolated from dropped feathers in the area. Drs. Melissa Palmer and Chris Faulk are hosting this seminar. Again, Dr. Isabelle Paquet-Durand will give her talk on Tuesday, February 7th at 3 pm in 365 Haecker Hall. Please come join us and support this conservation and authentic undergraduate research! 

      

Reprinted as posted in ‘Inside CFANS’ newsletter.

CFANS Integrated Animal Systems Biology team will conduct a short course from Jan. 19-27 for a team of molecular biologists from Charoen Pokphand (CP) in Bangkok. CP is the largest feed company in Asia, conducting business in 12 countries and producing 27.65 million metric tons per year. They're also one of the largest swine and poultry integrators in the world. 

"As our team continues to build long-term, collaborative research partnerships with multi-national animal agriculture and food businesses in Minnesota, the U.S. and around the world, one of the many benefits we can provide is training in state-of-the-art molecular biology and 'omics' approaches to improve productivity and efficiency in food animal production," said Department of Animal Science Professor Jerry Shurson. "While many progressive, global animal agriculture companies have assembled similar types of teams, they often struggle with how to integrate this powerful expertise in solving practical animal nutrition and production problems in the industry. This is what we do best and one of the reasons that our team is attracting global interest."

Position:

Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, tenure-track (9-month) position with Extension (60%) and Research (40%) responsibilities involving beef production systems. The position is in the Department of Animal Science (http://ansci.umn.edu), College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resources Sciences (http://www.cfans.umn.edu/ ) and will begin fall 2017. The successful candidate is expected to develop independent as well as collaborative research and Extension programs and to recruit and mentor graduate students including those from culturally diverse backgrounds. Collaboration among research and Extension faculty and with colleagues in other disciplines.

Location:

The position is located at the Department of Animal Science on the St. Paul Campus. The Department of Animal Science enrolls over 400 undergraduate and over 40 graduate students. Graduate students develop their programs in one of three areas: nutrition, physiology or production systems management.

The Minnesota Beef Industry:

Minnesota’s beef industry generates over one billion dollars in cash receipts annually. This places its importance in the top three livestock industries in Minnesota, after the swine and dairy industry. There are approximately 15,500 beef producers scattered across the state with beef feedlots concentrated in southwestern Minnesota and cow-calf herds located throughout the state.

University of Minnesota Beef Research Program:

The person in this position is expected to conduct translational research in areas to include reproductive techniques to enhance productivity; impact of genetic decisions on production efficiency; beef nutritional environment and its interaction with reproductive health or productive processes; and production systems investigating the interaction of beef cattle and forage and grain crops.

University of Minnesota Extension:

The University of Minnesota Extension is the major outreach arm of the University of Minnesota, a land grant institution with a mission to serve the public through applied research and education. The mission of the University of Minnesota Extension is: Making a difference by connecting community needs and University resources to address critical issues in Minnesota.

The individual in this position will become a member of the University of Minnesota Beef Team. The University of Minnesota Beef Team facilitates dissemination of results derived through research. The team has been actively involved in delivering quality programming to beef producers for over 20 years. As such, the team has established a solid reputation for discovering stakeholder learning needs through a yearly planning meeting and close interactions with the Minnesota State Cattlemen’s and Minnesota Beef Council. The team has established extension programming based on audience needs. Other collaborative research and education opportunities are presented through participation in projects from faculty in Departments of Animal Science, Agronomy, Biosystems and Biological Engineering, Entomology and College of Veterinary Medicine. In addition, the team has been involved in research and outreach projects in collaboration with MN Department of Agriculture, National Research Conservation Service, Board of Water and Soil Resources, Department of Natural Resources, Board of Animal Health and Farm Business Management Association.

Responsibilities and Expectations:

Applicants should have the ability to establish and maintain an innovative, independent and collaborative, extramurally funded research program, develop and deliver excellence in Extension programming, and contribute to the public service mission of the University.

Extension (60%):

  • Provide strong leadership and effective Extension programming on critical issues related to beef production systems. 
  • Be an active and collaborative member of the University of Minnesota Extension Beef Team.
  • Publish in research and industry relevant publications. 
  • Serve as a resource for beef production stakeholders in Minnesota and beyond.

Research (40%):

  • Conduct translational research relative to beef production systems. Research topics associated with this goal include, but are not limited to, use of reproductive techniques to enhance productivity; impact of genetic decisions on production efficiency; beef nutritional environment and its interaction with reproductive health or productive processes; and production systems investigating the interaction of beef cattle and forage and grain crops. 
  • Achieve national and international recognition, support graduate student research, publish in relevant refereed journals, and attract extramural funding. 
  • Contribute to research programs in beef cattle reproduction, production and management within the Department, and interdisciplinary collaboration with faculty across the University of Minnesota and beyond.

Qualifications:

Required:

  • Ph.D. in animal science or a closely related field involving beef.
  • Demonstrated ability to propose and conduct independent and team-based beef research.
  • Publication record in peer reviewed scientific journals. 
  • Evidence of skills in disseminating educational programming to producer clientele and/or lay audiences

Preferred:

  • Evidence of obtaining extramural grant funding. 
  • Experience in graduate advising and mentoring.
  • Experience and ability to work with research and Extension teams in an interdisciplinary, diverse, and multicultural environment.
  • Experience in field based applied research.
  • Evidence of communication of research to external audiences. 
  • Evidence of utilization of innovative teaching methods and technology.

Salary/Benefits:

Salary is competitive and commensurate with experience and qualifications. The 9-month salary (option to be paid over 12 months) can be supplemented through research and/or educational grants. Salary will be supplemented with 9 weeks of summer salary for the first two (2) years of the appointment to help establish a research program. Benefits include employee and dependent health, dental, and faculty life/disability insurance, social security, faculty retirement and opportunities for professional development, including mentoring, and sabbatical and semester leave opportunities. Benefits are described at http://www1.umn.edu/ohr/benefits/index.html.

Application:

Apply online at: http://employment.umn.edu/ (search for requisition #314971) Candidates should attach a letter of application, curriculum vitae, statement of research and extension teaching accomplishments, experience and interests (3 pg. max), and the names, addresses and email contact information for 3 professional references. References will be contacted only for those applicants judged most appropriate. Incomplete applications will not be considered. Note: During the interview process, applicants will be asked to describe their commitment, experience and approach to teaching and working with students, colleagues and constituents from diverse populations.

Direct inquiries to:

Beef Production Systems Search Committee, Dept. of Animal Science, Attn: Dana Souther, 1364 Eckles Ave, 305 Haecker Hall, St. Paul, MN 55108, email: south005@umn.edu, 612-624-7453.

Review of applications begins February 27, 2017.

Position will remain open until filled.

Any offer of employment is contingent upon the successful completion of a background check.

As an institution committed to demonstrating excellence through diversity, the College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences and the University are committed to hiring a diverse faculty and staff, and strongly encourage candidates from historically underrepresented groups to apply. Finalists will be expected to address their commitment and experience in working with diverse populations during the interview process. We welcome you to visit our college’s Diversity and Inclusion web page at: http://www.cfans.umn.edu/diversity/

Dr. Scott O’Grady received a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) that investigates the underlying mechanisms by which environmental allergens induce inflammation and susceptibility to asthma. These studies are designed to identify novel signaling pathways and potential drug targets relevant to the development of new pharmacotherapies for the treatment of allergic inflammation of the airways. The grant is a continuation of NIH funding based on a long-standing collaboration between Dr. Scott O'Grady and Dr. Hirohito Kita, Director of the Allergic Diseases Research Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. The total award amounts to $2,564,749 with approximately $1.4 million awarded to Dr. O'Grady for a period of 5 years.

Over a hundred cattle feeders took an evening away from other obligations at the farm and home to attend the December 2016 University of Minnesota Extension Cattle Feeder Days program, a flagship program of the University of Minnesota Beef Team with a long history of delivering a quality program of research-based topics tailored to the unique challenges and opportunities associated with feeding cattle in Minnesota.

The program featured four invited speakers that focused on managing feedlot cattle to optimize performance, profit and cattle welfare with a focus on addressing the challenges of Minnesota weather extremes. Mr. Ed Greiman, a cattle feeder from Iowa and chair of the NCBA Cattle Marketing Committee, discussed price discovery in the fed cattle market and addressed the challenges of the recent volatile market environment. Mrs. Ashley Kohls, Beef Quality Assurance Coordinator and Executive Director of the Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Association, presented on the BQA feedlot self-assessments and the importance of documenting the steps that cattle feeders take to ensure the production of a quality product with a focus on maximizing cattle welfare.

The two final presentations of the night were presented by Dr. Sheri Bundy and Dr. Sean Montgomery, both consulting feedlot nutritionists with Cornbelt Livestock Services who work with feedlots across the nation and internationally. Dr. Bundy presented results from a recent research analyses, conducted in collaboration with Dr. Alfredo DiCostanzo of the University of Minnesota, on the impact of feedlot environment on weather environment and its role in determining the economic sustainability of constructing confinement cattle feeding facilities. Dr. Montgomery wrapped things up with a detailed look into strategies to mitigate heat and cold stress in feedlot cattle which gave a detailed overview of the available research but also focused on tips he has employed with success in his role as a feedlot consultant.

Over 95% of producers indicated they were likely or would definitely implement the information covered at the meeting within their own operation. With a combined one-time feeding capacity of 22,000 head, in addition to the attendance of industry professionals who can further expand the reach of the program, the 2016 Cattle Feeder Day program was able to reach a significant portion of the Minnesota Cattle Feeding Industry with timely, relevant information that stakeholders can directly implement to improve and support the production of high quality beef. 

For more information on this program and others offered by the University of Minnesota Beef Team please visit www.extension.umn.edu/beef and follow us on Facebook and Twitter @UMNBeefTeam.

Reprinted as posted on UMN West Central Research Outreach Center’s website.

Docking the tail or not: Effect on welfare and performance of growing-finishing pigs

Tail biting is a common problem in grow-finish pigs.  Outbreaks of tail biting can cause major welfare complications of pigs with damaged tails.  Because tail docking can cause pain in pigs, performing tail docking on a routine basis is under scrutiny due to animal welfare concerns.

Recently Yuzhi Li, Associate Professor of Swine Behavior and Welfare re-evaluated the consequences of raising pigs without tail docking in a study conducted at the West Central Research and Outreach Center near Morris, MN. Read on...

Solar Panels Power WCROC Swine Barn

Researchers at the West Central Research and Outreach Center (WCROC) have been involved in a multi-faceted project called the "Greening of Agriculture."  The overarching goal of this project is to reduce the reliance of modern production agriculture on fossil fuels.  One way to reduce this reliance is to shift energy demand from non-renewable fossil fuels to renewable energy sources.  Major food companies are asking agriculture producers to move in this direction. Read on...

The University of Minnesota Beef Team is proud to host the annual Cow/Calf Days Seminar Tour and Trade Show at 10 locations across the state in January and February. This event has been held for over 40 years and continues to be the leading information, technology, and research outlet for cow/calf producers in the state of Minnesota.

The 2017 event will feature information on managing scours in calves, results of a University of Minnesota study on the impact of different hay rake designs, grazing management, and results of a University of Minnesota study on the impact of hay feeder design on hay waste. Updates from the Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Association will also highlight the event. The corresponding tradeshow will feature vendors with new information, technology, and products with a wide-array of practical uses for the operators in the cow-calf sector.

The program is directed at cow/calf producers, allied industry representatives, and is open to the public. A meal will be served with the program and a registration fee of $10 will include the meal, proceedings book, and program materials.

More information can be found at the Cow/Calf Days Seminar Tour and Trade Show website: www.extension.umn.edu/beef or contact Eric Mousel at 218.398.1916, emmousel@umn.edu.

Southern Tour

JAN 23 - Mora, MN, 5:30 PM, Kanabec Co. Jail, 18 N Vine St.

JAN 24 - Starbuck, MN, 9:30 AM, Jim Wulf Bull Development Center, 30819 250th St.

JAN 25 - Pipestone, MN, 9:30 AM, MN West Comm. College, 1314 N Hiawatha Ave.

JAN 26 – Oronoco, MN, 5:30 PM, Tony Rossman Farm, 7000 70th St. NW

JAN 27 – Le Center, MN, 9:30 AM, Le Sueur Co. Fairgrounds, 320 S. Plut Ave.

Northern Tour

FEB 7 – Staples, MN, 9:30 AM, Central Lakes College, 1830 Airport Road

FEB 7 – Bagley, MN, 5:30 PM, American Legion, 288 Main Ave. N.

FEB 8 – Lancaster, MN, 5:30 PM, Community Center

FEB 9 – Roseau, MN, 5:30 PM, Gene’s Bar Grill, 1095 3rd St. NW

FEB 10 – Iron Junction, MN, 5:30 PM, Clinton Community Center, 8907 MN-37

News and Announcements

The Department of Animal Science, College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences at the University of Minnesota is proud to announce a call for nominations for the first annual Golden Alumni Award. The award is intended to recognize and honor an outstanding alumna or alumnus of the Department of Animal Science. The award will be presented during the Department’s annual showcase which highlights the work of our faculty, students, and alumni.

 

Nominations are invited based on the following:

  • One recipient will be chosen annually in February and invited to participate in the Department of Animal Science Showcase event in April. The award includes travel to campus and related expenses.
  • Nominees must have received a baccalaureate or graduate degrees from the Department of Animal Science.
  • Current staff or faculty in the department or sitting Regents, are not eligible for this award.
  • Nominees are chosen based on their demonstrated distinction in their professional lives, recognition for outstanding contributions to animal agriculture and exceptional service to or volunteer activities in their field.

Nominations consist of a letter highlighting the nominee’s accomplishments, a current resume, and two letters of support. Only one nomination from the same source will be accepted in any given year.

 

Nominations will be accepted at any time, but must be received by February 15th, 2017 to be considered for the current year’s award. The award will be presented at a departmental event on Tuesday, April 11th , 2017.

 

Nominations not previously selected will be held for two years. The recipient will be selected by the Communications Committee of the Department of Animal Science.

Nominations should be sent to:     

(Please send PDF via email or USPS)

 

Allison Berth

UMN Department of Animal Science

1364 Eckles Avenue, 305 Haecker Hall

St. Paul, MN 55108

Email: berth034@umn.edu

 

Welcome to our new graduate students that started with us this week for the spring semester! We’re excited to have you here.

Anna Clarke (M.S.) advised by Dr. Lee Johnston and Dr. Jerry Shurson

Anna, originally from Huntington Beach, California, moved to the Midwest to complete an undergraduate degree from Iowa State University. She received a bachelor of science in Animal Science in the spring of 2015. During her time at Iowa State she was involved in work being done in a swine nutrition physiology lab. After graduation she accepted a job with BioMatrix International, a small animal feed additive company focused on natural alternatives to antibiotics. Research interests include feed additives in nursery pigs and how they will affect overall performance and gut health, and additives for sows to improve their health and litters. When not in school or at work Anna enjoys playing soccer, watching sports, and playing fetch with her new puppy.

Julia Holen (M.S.) advised by Dr. Lee Johnston

Julia grew up in Fergus Falls, Minnesota on a small hobby farm raising beef cattle, swine, and egg production chickens. She was very involved in the Minnesota 4-H program growing up, and very quickly became interested in pursuing a career working with livestock. After spending her freshman year at Iowa State University, she decided to transfer to the University of Minnesota to complete her undergraduate degree. Julia graduated last fall (2016) with a major in Animal Science and a minor in Agronomy.

During her time as an undergraduate, Julia participated in two summer internship programs at the West Central Research and Outreach Center, and another with JBS United in Indiana specific to research in swine nutrition. Her experiences through these internships ultimately sparked her interest moving forward to pursue an M.S. in Swine Nutrition.

In her free time, Julia enjoys traveling, reading, attending sporting events, and working with livestock.

Jordan Juckel (M.S.) advised by Dr. Ryan Cox

Jordan completed her undergraduate Animal Science degree at the University of Minnesota this past December after only 2 1/2 short years. She decided that she wanted to continue my education here at the University of Minnesota, so here she is! She is currently a Master’s Student with Dr. Ryan Cox studying Animal Science with a focus on Meat Science.  She is looking forward to expanding her knowledge in this industry!



Mateus Peiter (M.S.) advised by Dr. Marcia Endres

Mateus Peiter is a veterinarian that graduated in December of 2016 at the Federal University of Santa Maria, Brazil. He has majored in dairy since his first year in college, and now he is going to focus on dairy calves’ welfare and behavior during graduate school along with Dr. Marcia Endres. 

University of Minnesota Meat Science provides top-notch education opportunities for those interested in learning about the meats industry in the United States. Join Dr. Ryan Cox, the primary instructor for the Meat Science 101 Evening Course, as he explores the science, production and processing of red meat and poultry from the farm to the fork. Weekly presentations will be a blend of technical and non-technical lectures, meat processing demonstrations, and invited speakers that will provide unique insight to each of the topics. Material is targeted to audiences of all backgrounds and experience.

View flyer here.

Registration Rates

Registration for the Meat Science 101 Evening Course is $525 per participant. Registration can be carried out online at:

https://www.regonline.com/meatscience101

If you have any further questions regarding the Meat Science 101 Evening Course or any other Meat Science Extension program, please contact:

Dr. Ryan Cox

University of Minnesota

155D Haecker Hall

1364 Eckles Avenue

St. Paul, MN 55108-6118

Phone: 612-624-3063

Email: ryancox@umn.edu

The Minnesota Milk Producers Association is hosting Dairy Day at the Capitol on February 1, 2017.

What to Expect

  • Friendly face-to-face conversations with legislators who can make a real impact to your business.
  • Group leaders and resources to help you talk about the issues.
  • Flexibility to come and go as your schedule allows.

Register here: http://www.mnmilk.org/events/register.aspx?id=873407

Tentative Schedule of Events

  • Welcome Center Open 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Room 400N – Fourth Floor State Office Building, 100 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd, Saint Paul, MN 55155

  • 8:30 to 4:30 p.m. Meetings with dozens of legislators already planned

Requested meetings with Governor Mark Dayton, Department of Agriculture staff, and MPCA commissioner John Linc Stine.

5:30 p.m. Reception sponsored by Minnesota Agri-Growth Council, Minnesota History Center

 

Bus from Melrose and St. Cloud:

Mayer’s Bus Garage, Melrose 6:30 a.m.

Minnesota Select Sires, St. Cloud 7:10 a.m.

8:30 arrive State Office Building

Depart Minnesota History Center at 6:30 p.m.

7:55 p.m. return to MN Select Sires

8:30 p.m. return to Melrose, Mayer’s Bus Garage

Dairy farmers are invited to Midwest Dairy Association’s Minnesota Division District Meetings beginning Wednesday, Jan. 4, and continuing through April. Twenty meetings are scheduled, each of which will include a report from the dairy farmer board member serving the district, along with an update from staff and a complimentary meal. 

County American Dairy Association groups may also conduct business in conjunction with the meetings. Several locations will also include Minnesota Milk Producers Association Dairy Management Workshops. Dairy farmers may attend the meeting closest to them, regardless of the district in which they live. No RSVPs are required.

 

District meetings are a chance for dairy farmers to learn how their checkoff investment is spent and ask questions of the board members they elect to manage the program. In 2016, Midwest Dairy launched an initiative called Dairy 3 for Me, for which more than 10,000 pledges were made by people who recognized the importance of getting three servings of dairy each day for good health.

The meeting presentation will explain how Dairy 3 for Me applies to the farm families who make those three servings available, how dairy partners are helping to champion the importance of dairy, and how the community and country benefits from dairy.

To view the full schedule please go here: https://www.midwestdairy.com/for-farmers/

For more information, contact Alyssa Olson at 1-877-577-0741 or email aolson@midwestdairy.com.

Equine Management

William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute is located in Chazy, New York, about 40 miles south of Montreal in the Champlain Valley. For more than a quarter of a century, the Institute has conducted programs in education and research, foremost of which are in-residence undergraduate programs in agriculture and environmental science. The Summer Experience programs in Equine Management, Farm Management, and Agricultural Research offer credits through a combination of workshops, field trips, and independent study. The William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute consists of 8,600 acres of land, including miles of hiking and biking trails available to students. Our dairy facility houses approximately 300 registered Holstein cows in an automated free stall barn and 16-stall tie stall barn used for conducting research trials. The dairy and crop operation serve as a learning environment for students enrolled in the Summer Experience in Farm Management program. The most prominent original farm building is currently home to Miner Institute’s herd of approximately 25 Morgan horses. In addition, there are horses boarded for various purposes including stallion or mare reproductive services and training. A phantom breeding mount and fully-equipped laboratory at the barns allow for on-site collection and processing of fresh-cooled and frozen semen.

 

ABOUT THE PROGRAM Weekly meetings update the students about farm activities; equine, dairy, crops and research. Extended sessions on relevant topics such as nutrition, reproduction, training, health and field crops will be held throughout the summer. Instructors include Miner Institute faculty members Katie Ballard, Kurt Cotanch, Heather Dann, Wanda Emerich, Rick Grant, Karen Lassell. The small class size makes it possible to tailor the program to better meet the needs of each student. Students interested in careers in stable or breeding management, agricultural extension, and veterinary medicine have found this program to be particularly useful. Each student will choose a project horse to evaluate, train, and market for sale. Responsibilities for this project will include preparing a video of the horse as well as oral and written final presentations on the horse and the process. An active research program at Miner includes aspects in the equine area such as stallion semen preservation and horse behavior. The students are crucial to making these studies happen and are invited to become more involved if interest takes them in that direction.

 

Students will learn ground training techniques including halter breaking, lungeing, longlining, and ground driving. The versatility of the Morgan and varied ages and abilities of horses at Miner Institute allow for students to experience many different disciplines to varying degrees: saddleseat, huntseat, dressage, western pleasure and driving. Students become proficient at stallion handling, semen collection, and processing as well as broodmare management. Students will have an opportunity to participate in other Miner farm operations including milking, pasture management, and a variety of fi eld work activities.

 

This program is available to agriculture and life science students in their junior or senior years of study. The number of students for the Equine Management program is limited to ensure the intensity of this “handson” experience. Each student’s stipend for the 13-week semester is $3,000. The students live at Miner Institute, where dormitory housing and breakfast and lunch each weekday are provided for $300 for the summer.

Application

Karen Lassell Equine Manager
Miner Institute
P.O. Box 90 Chazy, NY 12921
518-846-7121, ext. 120
518-846-8445 (fax)

Agricultural Research

The William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute is located in Chazy, New York, about 40 miles south of Montreal in the Champlain Valley. For more than a quarter century, Miner Institute has conducted programs in education and research, foremost of which are in-residence undergraduate programs in agriculture and environmental science. The Summer Experience in Agricultural Research offers a unique combination of work experience and independent study. The William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute consists of 8,600 acres of land, including many miles of hiking and biking trails available to students. The dairy facility houses ~ 300 lactating Holstein cows in an automated free stall barn. A pen equipped with the Calan Broadbent Feeding System and a 16 cow tie stall facility are used for conducting research trials. The dairy and crop operations serve as a learning environment for students enrolled in the Summer Experience in Farm Management program. Miner Institute also breeds, trains and shows a herd of approximately 25 Morgan horses, utilized by students enrolled in the Summer Experience in Equine Management program. Students interested in careers in veterinary medicine and graduate school will fi nd the Summer Experience in Agricultural Research useful in preparing for academic and career opportunities in the agricultural research field.

 

ABOUT THE PROGRAM Weekly meetings update the students about research and farm activities including dairy, crops and equine. Extended sessions on relevant topics such as nutrition, reproduction, mastitis management, animal health and fi eld crops will be held throughout the summer. Students will also participate in a weekly seminar series. Instructors include Miner Institute faculty members Katie Ballard, Kurt Cotanch, Heather Dann, Wanda Emerich, Rick Grant, Steve Kramer, Karen Lassell, Eric Young and graduate students. The small class size makes it possible to at least partially tailor the program to meet the needs of each student. Each student will become involved in an independent study project in one of the areas which is the focus of Miner Institute’s research program: dairy nutrition, dairy behavior, equine behavior, dairy reproduction, equine reproduction, crops, nutrient management, and calf management. Each student will work with a faculty member to plan, conduct, and summarize the project. At the end of the summer, oral and written reports will be presented. All students will be asked to work long hours on occasion, but no more so than would normally be expected in an agricultural research facility as a graduate student or technician. Students work approximately every other weekend.

 

This program is available to agriculture and life science students in their junior or senior years of study. Students are encouraged to register for college credit at their home institution. Students are responsible for making arrangements for credits. This program is designed as a 4-credit course, although other arrangements may be made through the student’s home institution. Each student’s stipend for the 13-week semester is $3,000. The students live at Miner Institute, where dormitory housing and breakfast and lunch each weekday are provided for $300 for the summer.

Application

Katie Ballard
Director of Research
Miner Institute
P.O. Box 90
Chazy, New York 12921
518-846-7121, ext. 112
518-846-8445 (fax)

 

Farm Management

The William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute is located in Chazy, New York, about 40 miles south of Montreal in the Champlain Valley. For more than a quarter century, Miner Institute has conducted programs in education and research, foremost of which are in-residence undergraduate programs in agriculture and environmental science. The Summer Experience in Farm Management offers credits through a combination of workshops and independent study. Modern facilities enable students to combine the commercial farm experience with applied management training. The William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute consists of 8,600 acres of land, including many miles of hiking and biking trails available to students. A dairy facility, newly constructed in 2008, houses approximately 300 registered Holstein cows in an automated free stall barn and 16-stall tie-stall barn used for conducting research trials. Miner Institute also breeds, trains and shows a herd of approximately 25 Morgan horses.

 

ABOUT THE PROGRAM The Summer Experience in Farm Management introduces students to the modern farm as a business, which has as its objective the conversion of plants into milk and meat. All students will be asked to work long hours on occasion, but no more so than would normally be expected on a dairy farm. Students work approximately every other weekend. Weekly meetings update the students about farm activities; a combination of dairy, crops. Extended sessions on relevant topics such as nutrition, reproduction, mastitis management, animal health, and field crops will be held throughout the summer. Instructors include Miner Institute faculty members Katie Ballard, Kurt Cotanch, Heather Dann, Wanda Emerich, Rick Grant, Karen Lassell, and Eric Young. The small class size makes it possible to at least partially tailor the program to meet the needs of each student. Students interested in careers in veterinary medicine, farm management, vocational agriculture and agricultural extension have found this program to be particularly useful. Students will get experience in aspects of everyday farm management practices such as milking, herd health, calves, and a variety of field work activities such as tillage, planting, and harvest. Students will participate in weekly farm management discussions with Steve Couture, Anna Pape and other barn staff. The students will also fi t and show a string of dairy cattle at the local county fair. Students will have the opportunity to enroll in an Artificial Insemination certification course offered in cooperation with personnel

from a bull stud. This optional course will be offered to all interested students.

 

This program is available to agriculture and life science students in their junior or senior years of study. Students are encouraged to register for college credit at their home institution. Students are responsible for making arrangements for credits. This program is designed as a 4-credit course, although other arrangements may be made through the student’s home institution. Each student’s stipend for the 13-week semester is $3,000. The students live at Miner Institute, where housing and breakfast and lunch each weekday are provided for $300 for the summer.

 Application

For more information, contact:
Wanda Emerich
Dairy Outreach Coordinator
Miner Institute
P.O. Box 90
Chazy, NY 12921
518-846-7121, ext. 117
518-846-8445 (fax)
emerich@whminer.com

Graduate Student Spotlights

Hannah is pursuing her Master’s with a focus in organic dairy systems and is advised by Dr. Brad Heins. Her projects involve grazing dairy steers on small grain cover crops and investigating an herbal-based painkiller used when disbudding calves. Hannah gets to spend her summers in Morris at the West Central Research and Outreach Center (WCROC). Research at the WCROC investigates crossbreeding, fly control, out wintering, calf feeding strategies, forage types, renewable energy, and more, so she never gets bored! Her favorite part about her research is being able to work outdoors on a diversified farm.

Hannah was born and raised in Covington, Washington so it’s no surprise that she’s always up for an outdoor adventure. She received a B.S. at Iowa State University in Animal Science and her favorite thing about living in the Midwest is the sunshine.

In her free time, she plays on the Menagerie Women’s Minneapolis Rugby team, goes dancing with friends, and cuddles her cat, Bagheera.

Joey was born and raised a Packer fan in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He started his undergraduate career at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and then transferred to the University of Minnesota in his second semester. He obtained his bachelor’s degree in animal science, and gained interest in animal nutrition during his senior year when he began volunteering in the lab of Dr. Milena Saqui-Salces.

He is now pursuing his Master’s degree in animal science, specifically with a focus on swine nutrition, and is co-advised by Dr. Milena Saqui-Salces and Dr. Gerald Shurson. His research focuses on microalgae, specifically investigating its effect on growth performance and health status in nursery pigs. Joey hopes to use the knowledge that he gains within the program to move on to exotic animal nutrition, which is where his true passion lies. Specifically, he hopes to be a zoo nutritionist, and help the amazing exotic animals that habitat the incredible zoos across the country.

In his free time, Joey enjoys playing the drums, or any other musical instrument that he can get his hands on.  He also has a passion for comedy and tries to attend as many comedic performances as possible. Last, but certainly not least, he spends as much time as he can with family and friends, because without them he would not be where he is today.

Congratulations

Congratulations to the following graduate students who gave their final defense and passed this past month!

• Mike Donnelly (M.S.) advised by Drs. Les Hansen and Bradley Heins
• Kathryn Ruh (M.S.) advised by Dr. Brad Heins

Calendar of Events

January 25, 2017 – MN Milk Winter Workshop (includes concurrent session for Spanish speaking employees), Rochester, MN (Questions can be sent to: mmpa@mnmilk.org)

January 25, 2017 – UMN Swine Extension- Pork Quality Assurance Plus training & Transport Quality Assistance training, Waseca, MN

More information here.

February 1, 2017Dairy Day at the Capitol, St. Paul, MN

February 6, 2017 – Minnesota Dairy Initiative Workshop –Robotics: Are they in your future labor force?

February 8, 2017 – UMN Swine Extension- Pork Quality Assurance Plus training & Transport Quality Assistance training, Rochester, MN

More information here.

February 9, 2017 – MN Milk Winter Workshop (includes concurrent session for Spanish speaking employees), Hutchinson, MN (Questions can be sent to: mmpa@mnmilk.org)

February 15-20, 2017Minnesota Milk Texas Tour

February 16, 2017Winter Dairy Series – Selective Dry Cow Therapy, Glencoe, MN

February 19, 2017 – Gopher Dairy Club – 334d Annual Recognition Banquet, Radisson Roseville, MN

11:30 AM reception, 12:30 pm meal followed by program

February 20, 2017 Carver County Dairy Expo

February 22, 2017 – UMN Swine Extension- Pork Quality Assurance Plus training & Transport Quality Assistance training, Mankato, MN

More information here.

February 23, 2017 – Minnesota Dairy Initiatives workshop, New Ulm, MN

March 2, 2017 – Minnesota Dairy Initiatives workshop, Owatonna, MN (Questions can be sent to: mmpa@mnmilk.org)     

March 8, 2017 – UMN Swine Extension- Pork Quality Assurance Plus training & Transport Quality Assistance training, Marshall, MN

More information here.

March 13, 2017 – Minnesota Dairy Initiative Workshop – Grazing Alternatives

March 15, 2017 – UMN Swine Extension- Pork Quality Assurance Plus Advisor Training, Mankato, MN

More information here.

March 16, 2017Winter Dairy Series – Reduced Lignin Alfalfa, Gaylord, MN

March 22, 2017 – UMN Swine Extension- Pork Quality Assurance Plus training & Transport Quality Assistance training, Morris, MN

More information here.

April 5, 2017 – UMN Swine Extension- Pork Quality Assurance Plus training & Transport Quality Assistance training, Rice, MN

More information here.

April 11-13, 2017 MN Dairy Health Conference

April 19, 2017 – UMN Swine Extension- Pork Quality Assurance Plus training & Transport Quality Assistance training, Waseca, MN

More information here.

May 17, 2017 – UMN Swine Extension- Pork Quality Assurance Plus training, Hutchinson, MN

More information here.

May 30-June 1, 2017 - 32nd ADSA Discover Conference on Food Animal Agriculture: Dairy Replacement Heifers - Transitioning from Weaning through First Lactation, Eaglewood Resort & Spa, Itasca, IL

June 14, 2017 – UMN Swine Extension- Pork Quality Assurance Plus training & Transport Quality Assistance training, Mankato, MN

More information here.

June 28, 2017 – UMN Swine Extension- Pork Quality Assurance Plus training, Mankato, MN

More information here.

June 25-28, 2017 - ADSA Annual Meeting, Pittsburg, PA

July 19, 2017 – UMN Swine Extension- Pork Quality Assurance Plus training & Transport Quality Assistance training, Marshall, MN

More information here.

August 16, 2017 – UMN Swine Extension- Pork Quality Assurance Plus training & Transport Quality Assistance training, Waseca, MN

More information here.

August 30, 2017 – UMN Swine Extension- Pork Quality Assurance Plus training & Transport Quality Assistance training, Morris, MN

More information here.

November 8, 2017 – UMN Swine Extension- Pork Quality Assurance Plus training & Transport Quality Assistance training, Rochester, MN

More information here.

November 15, 2017 – UMN Swine Extension- Pork Quality Assurance Plus Advisor training, Mankato, MN

More information here.

More information here.